Recycling in the Farm Fields

As the daylight hours shorten, the landscape gradually transforms from the rich greens of summertime into various autumn shades of gold in the farm fields.  On the farm, that means one thing: harvest time! On our farm, we mainly grow field corn, soybeans, oats and hay. Some of these we grow organically, whereas others we use more conventional methods.

 

recycling on the farm
Sarah’s father, Paul Willis, with some farrowing hogs in the winter.

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Rural All American Apple Pie

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Sarah Willis at her family apple tree.

 

We have an old apple tree that grows right next to our gas barrel here on the farm.  Admittedly this is not an ideal location, but these are the very best apples for making apple pie.  My grandmother planted a crabapple tree (the only native apple tree to North America) there many years ago.  In the wild, apples are highly heterozygous and don’t grow true to the subspecies of seed.  Apples of all varieties are created by grafting trees onto a hardier apple root stock. This is how our favorite apple originated: from the root stock of the original crabapple, a separate seedling grew into another tree.  We are not sure what kind it is but believe it to be a Mackintosh.

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The 2016 Niman Ranch Farmer Appreciation Dinner

The tradition of the Niman Ranch Farmer Appreciation Dinner is alive and well! We recently celebrated our 18th annual event at the Embassy Suites Downtown in Des Moines, Iowa, on Saturday, August 27.

Each year we painstakingly select a group of highly acclaimed chefs who meet our strict criteria. They are award –winning chefs in their regions and they have shown a real commitment to supporting Niman Ranch and our family of farmers and ranchers not only through purchasing Niman Ranch meats but by raising awareness about how our network of family farmers raise the livestock.  Most often the initial reason many chefs choose Niman Ranch is because of the outstanding meat quality, but once they realize the connection with flavor and how the animals are raised, they become advocates for our entire program.

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On the Upswing

During winter, the Iowa prairie covered in snow blends seamlessly into the stark white sky, which can make it very difficult to see at times.  I have resorted to wearing my sunglasses so I don’t go snow blind!  It’s fun to observe the beauty that can be found during the winter months, while understanding the unique challenges that accompany it.  Winter brings about unpredictable weather.  Yesterday it was 40 degrees and today it’s 16.  Thanks to the most recent winter weather, the ground is covered in a blanket of snow scattered with animal tracks.

White on White

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Snowy Days

In preparation for the Super Bowl, I hit the grocery store and spent some time preparing snacks.  Despite not being a big football fan, I enjoy getting together with friends and family or just hanging out with my daughter to watch the big game.

This year, we experienced a blizzard warning during the game, which gave me another reason to head to the grocery store.  Blizzard shopping is a tradition on the prairie.  Of course, I live in town now, so there’s was not as much reason for me to make an emergency trip to the grocery store anymore.  But I still did it out of habit.  I’ll always be a farm girl no matter where I live.

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Of Family and Farming

Do you care where your meat comes from and want to feel confident when making purchases at the grocery store? Have you considered asking your local butcher about the farm producing the meat you are buying, and how the animals were raised on that farm?  If you haven’t, you should, because the way the animals were raised plays into the quality of the meat.

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The Hawkins family raises hogs for Niman Ranch in Missouri.

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Spring Farrowing

It’s that time of year again. Spring signifies new life, which is eaBrown Farmsily observed here on the farm. Recently, I visited fellow Niman Ranch Farmers Paul and Andrea Brown, who farm with their children right here in Iowa.  They raise pigs for Niman Ranch – just part of their entire operation. They rotate the pig’s pasture from year to year, incorporating livestock with their crop production to enrich the soil.

I often get asked what we use to take the place of farrowing crates. I like to say we take our lead from nature. Animals are already given the tools to reproduce and care for their own.  Farrowing in the pasture begins in the spring. I know my dad’s goal was to have everything set up for the sows in the field by April 1.  Historically, hog farmers utilized A- frame houses as shelters for pigs raised on pasture.

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Winter Farm Tour

It was a cold drearIMG_9235y day in February when our good friends from La Quercia, Herb and Kathy Eckhouse, called me to see if they could bring three people from the Boston Area including; Chris Himmel, Chef Nick Deutmeyer, and Chef Eric Brennan, from Grill 23, Post 390 and Harvest Cambridge, on a Niman Ranch farm tour. Their guests were interested to learn more about where their pork comes from, how the pigs were raised and why that matters in the creation of La Quercia’s artisanal meats.

We took our guests to visit long time Niman Ranch farmers Marlin and Judy Mowry. They came outside to greet us wearing warm winter coveralls while their farm dogs playfully pranced around with excitement. They said most of their pets were rescued from various bad situations, and were now finding solace here in a loving and safe environment. You could see the pride they take in the care of all their animals. The Mowrys were thrilled to host the tour and explained to us that they chose to work with Niman Ranch because they felt the animal handling protocols fell in line with their own core personal values about treating all life with respect.

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